“[Welcome to Bobby’s Motel] might prove Pottery to be one of the most exciting new bands around.

Listening to Pottery feels like a pedestrian being passed by a roaring bus, which has already moved on before they’ve had the chance to jump out of their skin. Released through Partisan Records, WTBM might prove Pottery to be one of the most exciting new bands around.

Pottery have developed their sound greatly since 2019’s No.1 – a raw and frenzied EP showcasing their ability to get you moving. We were lucky enough to catch Pottery play at Welsh festival ‘Greenman’ last year. Their performance was one to remember – with fast chops and changes with cool-dude hipsters chanting behind the instruments.

Bobby’s Motel started out as an inside joke between the band, but has evolved  magnificently into an alternative reality; just for us.

“Pottery love to trick us; giving us a healthy dose of [Welcome to Bobby’s Motel], only to transform it into a groovy, angsty dance party.”

Thundering snares and mysterious, disembodied voices welcome us into this psychedelic, rhythmic wonderland. Welcome to Bobby’s Motel fiercely starts a chaotic runaway train. Pottery love to trick us; giving us a healthy dose of this rampaging song, only to transform it into a groovy, angsty dance party.

Track 2, Hot Heater, is the first of, a generous, 4 tracks we were treated to prior to this album’s release. Wobbling synths, chanting gang vocals, those classic Pottery strumming jabs we all know and love, sprinkled with 80s influences. We dive deeper into the immersive world of Bobby’s Motel.

If you’re like us and have had the singles on repeat most days since this album’s original release date, April 10th, then you’re also gasping to hear some of the unheard boogies.

“A driving bass line, the squealing scratches on a crunchy guitar, the ever-impressive drum groove.”

Under the Wires wastes no time introducing us to a driving bass line, squealing scratches on a crunchy guitar, a range of percussive sounds that make up the ever-impressive drum groove. And you’re given no time to rest on Bobby’s Forecast, where chaotic, chanting vocals rile you into an overflowing state of bubbling dance moves.

“The unexpected section changes and constantly impressive instrumentation doesn’t allow a moment to stop and wallow in thought”

But who is Bobby? And why is he inviting us into his motel? Is Bobby the band? Is he you? Is he them? “There’s a piece of him in all of us”, says Pottery. He laughs in the face of day-to-day ambiguity, and tells you to forget about your useless worrying.

It couldn’t be clearer in the album that these are his motives. The unexpected section changes and constantly impressive instrumentation doesn’t allow a moment to stop and wallow in thought, but grabs your hand and keeps you driving forward.

“A swirling ambience, only to be ripped away by snapping drums”

That is, until, Down in the Dumps. Unlike any Pottery song we’ve heard before; we find a moment to breathe. But it’s not a restful moment: it’s tense, ominous, dreadful. A swirling ambience, only to be ripped away by snapping drums, and straight into another fierce number. The false feeling of rest makes a drop hit that much harder.

Similar themes follow in the oblivion of Reflections, an experimental psychedelic song straight from the 60s with a classic Pottery stamp – it puts us in mind of early Pink Floyd. The B-side tracks continue to surprise us: NY Inn is a pocket rocket, only two and a half minutes long. Quick and piercing guitars yield warnings in this western folk tale. What’s in Fashion shows us instrumental anomalies of drum machines and quirky pitter-patter guitars that don’t stay on a note long enough for you to know what it is, until it has already gone.

Pottery drilled deeper into the genre-defying bedrock on Texas Drums, Pt. I & II. A song that feels like a relentless chase on a fast speed train, with the perfect amount of cowbell breaks.

And finally: Hot Like Jungle– a great end to the album. When talking to other music lovers about this one, we’ve heard it referred to as the ‘lonely cigarette’ song – it feels like it’s perfect for a lonely cigarette. After the big night out, in the chaos of the world, this just centres you. And that is the feeling Pottery must be trying to evoke in this, as the closer. Those Montrealers have just blasted you out a cannon on this relentless and sonically astounding LP. This is what you need to safely wind down, and return to normality.

We need to thank Bobby for letting us stay at his motel for the last 45 minutes, helping us to ease our worries and to just lose ourselves in the energy and depth of one of the most exciting bands around at the moment.

9/10

Out Now.

Words: Jack Pritchard @jackpritchard_