“[The Mysterines] have channelled simplicity to perfection busting out a different styles of rock banger on every track on the Take Control EP.”

Still in their teens The Mysterines have deservedly achieved more than many musicians do in a lifetime. The group have channelled simplicity to perfection busting out a different styles of rock banger on every track on the Take Control EP, of which opening track Take Control is the only unreleased single. The Take Control EP feels like a celebration of all The Mysterines have accomplished so far packaged neatly as a 4 track for ease of listening.

Take Control is Lia’s finest vocal work and the band and producer James Skelly’s finest product together; it is the first track the band have used subtle lead guitar work to fill out the sound.”

In comparison to The Mysterines other singles (which make up the rest of the EP) opening track Take Control is a mellow number, mellow in that it uses chord progressions throughout the song as opposed to distorted power chords or lead riff guitar work. No matter what style The Mysterines throw at us as listeners it’s impossible to confuse it with any other band thanks to Lia Metcalfe’s commanding yet expressive vocal. Take Control is Lia’s finest vocal work and the band and producer James Skelly’s (renowned producer most well known as the frontman of The Coral) finest product together; it is the first track subtle the band have used subtle lead guitar work to fill out the sound.

“It won’t be long before [The Mysterines] hear the words of Hormone sung back to them by adolescents as loudly as their PA amplifying them.”

Kicking in straight after is debut single Hormone, a gritty garage rock composition aimed at verbalising the ferocious feelings of youth. Having just started 4 tourdates with Brighton duo done good, Royal Blood, the crowds are growing for The Mysterines and it won’t be long before the trio hear the words of Hormone sung back to them by adolescents as loudly as their PA amplifying them.

Previous single and track three on the EP Gasoline features similar guitar work to Take Control, a vocal pattern clearly influenced by Bob Dylan’s Subterranean Homesick Blues and just enough angst in lead chorus line “I just love to hate you” to steer clear of being vapid; Gasoline is the anthem The Mysterines weren’t ready to write when they wrote debut single Hormone.

Finishing the EP with Bet Your Pretty Face it has all the hallmarks of garage rock anthem Hormone; separating the two on the EP was an obvious choice. Lia channels anger at “pretty face[s having] doors” opened for them in what appears to be a metaphorical comment which most will relate to; another sure singalong to briefly release the listeners anger at their co-worker they’re overlooked to for promotions. In some ways could Bet Your Pretty Face feels ironic with the band having been paired up with Steve Lamacq, James Skelly and Alan Moulder before even releasing a single, whatever their relationships are with high level industry professionals their ability to craft anthemic rock is impossible to argue with.

“The Mysterines have one goal and that is to produce punchy rock to dance to like nobodies watching and sing along to like nobodies listening; achievement unlocked!”

The Take Control EP could have been released as a knee jerk reaction to the band being offered the guest spot on Royal Blood’s tour or it could have been a way to collate this first stage of the band, whatever its motives are it’s undeniable that The Mysterines have one goal and that is to produce punchy rock to dance to like nobodies watching and sing along to like nobodies listening; achievement unlocked!

9/10

Out Now

Words: James Wadsworth @jamespart31

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