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INTERVIEW: Munky. With A New Single Just Released And An EP On The Way We Chatted with Singer Zac.

Having just dropped evocative charity single ‘One In Five’ commentating on the current justice statistics of sexual assault on women and with their new EP release just around the corner we had to have a chat with singer and guitarist Zac to find out more about Irelands’ latest post-punk release.

Hey Munky! Thanks for making the time to chat with us today, how’s everything going? It must be a busy time for you guys right now!

Zac: Thank you for listening to us! Yeah pretty busy, but sure it’s always good to be busy.

After listening to the two single’s we’re pretty excited about your upcoming EP. Both songs we’ve heard so far are heavily influenced by politics/ current affairs, suggesting it’s a driving inspiration in your work? What can we expect to hear on the other tracks?

‘It’s a naive belief to think words in a song will change anything but it’s worth a shot, better than more songs about getting drunk in the club or shallow depictions of love.’

Zac: Thanks! It’s definitely a lyrical inspiration for this EP. The general theme or concept of this EP was kinda more “let’s stick all the angsty, angry tunes together” than anything. The other tracks do sort of follow suit, but the track Ms Communication is about a toxic relationship, and the one-for-all Irish solution to all of life’s many nuanced issues, pints! There’s also a song Cuck Rock that’s our attempt at G-Funk music. I suppose these songs are all quite political in their lyrics, but we don’t really want to be labelled as a political band. Have to give a nod to IDLES though who really inspired me to not be afraid of singing about your beliefs, or what you would like to see changed in the world. It’s a naive belief to think words in a song will change anything but it’s worth a shot, better than more songs about getting drunk in the club or shallow depictions of love.

We’re working on a follow up EP at the moment that’s a little more tongue-in-cheek. There’s a song about A 12-million-meter diameter disco ball, a refrigerator, and one honouring the legend Bootsy Collins.

Listening to you guys is a very authentic experience, but also feels reminiscent of other Dublin bands that have emerged recently. What is causing this Dublin sound right now?

‘But maybe now Irish artists have a new-found pride in their identity, they don’t need to try be anyone else, to try sound like anyone else or whatever.’

Zac: Theres a lot of frustration in the creative youth of Dublin. There’s a housing crisis which is totally out of hand, Dublin is now more expensive to live in than London and 90% of the gaffs and landlords are shite. I think the authenticity comes from Irish people being proud of being Irish. I have a sneaking feeling that the Irish people have widespread and chronic self-doubt ingrained into us, as a result of our history of being colonised for so long. But maybe now Irish artists have a new-found pride in their identity, they don’t need to try be anyone else, to try sound like anyone else or whatever. They can just make what they like. A lot of older Irish band’s sound like they could be English or American.

You also describe your sound as ‘telefunk, trashy funk/ grungy disco’, can you define what that means in terms of Munky’s signature sound? I’m currently seeing Chic covering Nirvana under a broken disco ball…

‘Gosh the telefunk, there’s a lot of boxes you have to fill in when creating a Facebook page and that was what we put in as genre.’

Zac: Gosh the telefunk, there’s a lot of boxes you have to fill in when creating a Facebook page and that was what we put in as genre. We sort of are a rock band who want to be a disco band, but don’t really sound like either. We all love soul, funk and disco and consciously allow those influences to come out in the compositions, but sonically we do keep it rough and ready. You’ve Got Male and One in Five are definitely the more buckfasty-avocado tunes but we try to sneak the disco influences in there, particularly in the bass and drum section being groovy. Both Nirvana and Chic are massive influences.

The music video for your last single was weird, amazing and very cleverly put together. What was the thought process behind its conception? What can we expect a video for ‘One In Five’, or any other songs on the upcoming EP?

‘Something about spending loads of time carefully making all the stuff for it just to be destroyed is alluring, I guess that’s the story of every human life to a degree.’

Zac: It was inspired by the game Super Smash Bros. There’s the boss you fight called Master Hand and he is just a pair of floating white gloves. Its super creepy. We also thought it would be cool to have these hands smash a bunch of houses/things made out of other things. Something about spending loads of time carefully making all the stuff for it just to be destroyed is alluring, I guess that’s the story of every human life to a degree.

You guys hit quite a few festivals in the UK and Ireland, what are your live plans and festival appearances this year?

Zac: We’ve a few dates lined up in the UK already, but would always love to have more. British music fans are absolutely brilliant, it’s a real pleasure to play over there.

Who are you hoping to go and see yourselves, what upcoming artists have your ears pricked at the moment?

Zac: We’re all making a big family trip to see Foals play in Trinity College. They’re a band we all quite enjoy, and their new album is dope. Kikagaku Moyo are coming to Dublin too, and Thee Oh Sees are playing the same week as them which is gonna be unreal. Bodega and Viagra Boys are two bands who we really love, Sam is also sort of in love with Tom Misch. In Ireland there’s these lads Stupid Son who released a song “Bread” which I think is deadly. Brass Phantoms are savage too, and Sick Love are a fantastic alt-rock outfit.

Questions by Georgia M Balson



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